GMO Project

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GMOProject

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GMOProject

“GeneticallyModified Organisms (GMO) are organisms whose genetic composition hasbeen altered through genetic engineering method”[ CITATION Nor15 l 1033 ].The modification process of the genetic material involves aninsertion of a gene from either a bacteria or a virus into anorganism with the goal of producing new features. The topic of GMOhas resulted in ideological schism over ethical and health concernssurrounding the issue. The paper elucidates of various viewsconcerning the genetic engineering process and GMO at large.

Pros

GMOproponents claim that genetic engineering process has helped farmersgrow crops immune to diseases hence improving yields. According toPamela Ronald, the injection of papaya with a virus has helped bringup plants resistant to diseases[ CITATION TED15 l 1033 ].Additionally, she has brought up the topic of genetic engineering,claiming it is the cheapest and efficient method that farmers can useto achieve agricultural production[ CITATION TED15 l 1033 ].The modification of seeds or plants such as rice allows crops resistharsh weather conditions, thus lowering the risk of crop failure.

Theuse of genetic engineering is favorable to the environment sincefewer or no chemicals are needed to control insecticides[ CITATION Mea13 l 1033 ].Additionally, GMO crops require relatively less machinery, and timethus help in reducing soil erosion and environmental pollution. Thereis enhanced productivity since farmers grow crops such as cotton andcorn without the use of insecticides these GMO crops yield theirinsecticides.Therefore, GMO production of crops has proven to be cost effective.

Cons

Theuse of genetic engineering in food crops has raised mixed reactionsamong consumers, with most people suggesting labeling of GMO foods. Atroublesome issue with GMO foods is the ability to induce allergy inhumans[ CITATION Nor15 l 1033 ].Some of these bacteria and viruses used in this technology have beenretrieved from sources that cause allergic reactions. Moreover, genetransfer could have an allergic impact on the resultant organism. Thefact that genetic engineering process uses bacteria and viruses tomodify organisms’ genetic material it poses a health peril andfear of occurrence of new diseases.

Geneticengineering could induce antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are hardto kill. The infections caused by antibiotic-resistant germs are over2 million, annually[ CITATION Nor15 l 1033 ].The use of antibiotic genes could result in antibiotic resistantbacteria. The use of GMO foods has also been linked to variousdiseases such as cancer, obesity, diabetes, stroke, and prematuredeath.

Geneticengineering process could lead to gene migration. Gene escape is aprocess where genes from one organism pass into another organism ofthe same species or even other species. There could be a graveproblem if herbicide-resistant genes passed into weeds[ CITATION Nor15 l 1033 ].Farmers would have to bear the cost of resistant weeds hencereducing production. However, scientific research on the subject hasbeen inconclusive with researchers having divided reactions andviews.

Conclusion

Thetopic on GMO substance has faced a lot of controversies over theconsumption of GMO foods. The safety aspect of GMO has beenemphasized numerous instances with scientists and healthprofessionals being divided on the issue. The rising health concernshave led to various policy measures in the food industry to ensureconsumer protection. Additionally, consumers are demanding labelingpractices to ensure that the consumer is aware of the food he or sheconsumes. More research studies ought to be conducted to establishthe health implications of GMO products on humans.

References

Meador, R. (2013). Genetically modified foods: A 30-year history of promise still unrealized. Earth Journal, 1-4. Retrieved from: https://www.minnpost.com/earth-journal/2013/05/genetically-modified-foods-30-year-history-promise-still-unrealized

Norer, R. (2015). Genetic Technology and Food Safety. New York: Springer.

TED (Director). (2015). The Case for engineering our food [Motion Picture].

GMO Project

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GMOProject

Author’sname

GMOProject

Geneticallymodified organisms (GMOs) are organisms whose genetic composition hasbeen modified through scientific technique, genetically engineeredmethod[ CITATION Ran15 l 1033 ].The modification of plants and animals’ genome has been there sinceantiquity, through traditional breeding methods. Overthe recent years, scientists have focused on agricultural plants assubject to genetic engineering[ CITATION Ran15 l 1033 ].Besides various benefits associated with genetic engineeringpractices, genetically modified substances have been a subject ofcontroversy in the society.

Body

Geneticengineering aims at inducing a foreign gene into an organism, hencealtering the natural and original state of that organism. As a resultof genetic alterations, changes of the metabolism, development rate,and receptiveness to external factors may occur. These changes have asignificant impact not only to the organism but also to the naturalenvironment where the organism proliferates[ CITATION Ran15 l 1033 ].Human consumption of genetically modified foods exposes them topotential health peril, such as exposure to allergens, loweredantibiotic resistance, and a risk of gene migration from one organismto the other.

PamelaRonald provides an interesting perspective of genetic engineering,citing that it is the cheapest and efficient technology to enhancefood security[ CITATION TED15 l 1033 ].She also adds that the use of viruses and bacteria in plants such aspapaya has produced genetically resistant crops. However, there is ahigh concern among the population that the technique will result inthe emergence of a new strain of diseases to humans.

Conclusion

Geneticallymodified substances have raised eyebrows among the general populace,resulting in measures such as labeling. There are numerous adverseimpacts of genetic engineering that researchers have identified couldbe chronic. Further research studies are necessary to evaluate thepractice of gene transfer and establish its impact on humans and theenvironment in the future.

References

Rangel, G. (2015). From Corgis to Corn: A Brief Look at the Long History of GMO Technology. Science in the News, 1-6. Retrieved from: http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2015/from-corgis-to-corn-a-brief-look-at-the-long-history-of-gmo-technology/

TED (Director). (2015). The Case for engineering our food [Motion Picture]. Retrieved from: https://www.ted.com/talks/pamela_ronald_the_case_for_engineering_our_food?language=en

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